MORBID CURIOSITY: Celebrity Tombstones Across America       |   home
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April
Thursday, 1 April

Paul Atkinson, guitarist (The Zombies), cause not reported, 58.

Ward Botsford, classical music producer, of leukemia, 76.

Carrie Snodgress, actress ("Diary of a Mad Housewife"), of heart failure, 57.

Friday, 2 April

Lawrence McGrew, NFL football player (New York Giants), cause not reported, 46.

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Brian Maxwell, a former world-ranked marathoner who created the PowerBar in his kitchen to improve his performance and kicked off a sports nutrition revolution in the process, has died of an apparent heart attack, friends said on Sunday.
He was 51. Maxwell collapsed on Friday while waiting on line to mail a package at the San Anselmo post office in northern California's Marin County, friends said.
He was taken to Marin County General Hospital where he was pronounced dead, a hospital spokeswoman said. Maxwell was jogging and eating breakfast with his family hours before he died, friend and former co-worker Debbie Pfeifer told Reuters. By all appearances he seemed healthy, she said.
"His sudden passing was a shock and he will be greatly missed," Pfeifer said. "His entrepreneurial spirit, competitive drive, and generosity touched the lives of many people."
Born in London, Maxwell grew up in Toronto. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1975 with a degree in architecture and received the Brutus Hamilton Award as the outstanding student athlete on the track team, according to the Internet sports resource, theactivenetwork.com, which listed Maxwell as a board member.
For eight years Maxwell earned a living as a long distance runner representing Canada in many international competitions. In 1977 he was ranked No. 3 marathoner in the world by Track & Field News. By 1980 he was the top-ranked Canadian marathon runner on the Olympic team that boycotted the Moscow Olympics.
In 1983 after winning 14 marathons Maxwell developed a stomach ailment that slowed his timing near the end of a race, causing him to finish a disappointing seventh.
He took to the kitchen in his Berkeley, California, apartment and began mixing various low-fat potions that could provide easily-digestible, quick energy.
The bar was developed over three years with help from Bill Vaughn, a biochemist from the University of California at Berkeley, and Jennifer Biddulph, a food science student who would later become his wife.
After offering homemade bars to several friends who claimed their performances improved, Maxwell decided to open a business. He poured his life savings into the company and manufactured 35,000 bars in malt-nut and chocolate flavors.
Maxwell was a natural grass-roots entrepreneur, said Pfeifer, who watched he and his wife personally hand out thousands of bars at Bay area sports events. "He wanted the company to appear bigger than it was so he painted a seven on one side of the PowerBar van and an eleven on the other to make it look like a fleet rather than just one van."
Over the next 13 years, PowerBar expanded into a multimillion-dollar company and created a bevy of competitors including Balance Bars and Clif Bars.
In 2000 the company was sold to Nestle SA, the world's biggest food company, for a reported $375 million, and Maxwell turned his energies to mentoring other entrepreneurs and philanthropic activities. He was also a big believer in maintaining a balance between work and family life, Pfeifer said, and he spent enormous amounts of time with his family. He is survived by his wife and six children.

Sunday, 4 April

George Bamberger, major-league baseball coach (Milwaukee Brewers), of cancer,
80.

Ron Williams, NBA basketball player (San Francisco Warriors), of a heart attack,
59.

Tuesday, 6 April

Victor Argo, actor, of lung cancer, 69.

Pompeo Posar, photographer ("Playboy"), 83. *** His date of death has not been
reported.

Jack Smith, TV news correspondent (ABC), of pancreatic cancer, 58.

Niki Sullivan, guitarist (Buddy Holly and The Crickets), of natural causes, 66.
KANSAS CITY (Reuters) - Niki Sullivan, who played rhythm guitar and sang backup
for Buddy Holly on his early hits with The Crickets, has died.

Sullivan, 66, died in his sleep at his home near Kansas City on Tuesday,
according to Tricia Earl of The Buddy Holly Center in Lubbock, Texas.

At an appearance two years ago at the museum, Earl said, Sullivan recalled the
uniqueness of Holly's early music when The Crickets' recorded such enduring
rock-and-roll hits as "That'll Be The Day" and "Maybe Baby," on which Sullivan's
voice can be heard in the original version.

Sullivan toured with The Crickets through 1957 but left the band when it became
apparent Holly did not need a second guitarist, Earl said.

Sullivan also had his own musical aspirations but met with little success,
forming The Plainsmen and The Hollyhawks.

A few months after Sullivan left the Crickets, the band broke up and Holly
struck out on his own. On Feb. 3, 1959, the small plane he chartered after an
Iowa concert crashed, killing the 22-year-old Holly and fellow rockers Ritchie
Valens and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson. The event was immortalized as "The
Day the Music Died" in Don McLean's hit, "American Pie."


Wednesday, 7 April

Marian McCargo Bell, actress ("The Undefeated"), of pancreatic cancer, 72=

Tuesday, 13 April
Caron Keating, TV announcer (British), of breast cancer, 41

Thursday, 15 April
Albie Grant, college basketball player (Long Island University), of
complications from diabetes, 60.
Jack Toney, southern gospel singer (The Statesmen Quartet), 70.
Yokoyama, cartoonist (Japanese), in a fire at his home, 69.

Saturday, 17 April
Dave Kirby, country & western songwriter ("Is Anybody Going to San Antone?"),
after a brief illness, 65.
Abdel Aziz Rantisi, Palestinian militant (Hamas), in an Israeli air strike,
56.

Monday April 19th
LONDON (Reuters) - Norris McWhirter, who founded Guinness World Records with his
twin brother and turned the book into a global best seller, has died aged 78, a
spokesman said on Tuesday.
McWhirter suffered a heart attack on Monday after playing tennis at his home in
south-west England, the spokesman said.

The London-born son of a newspaper director, McWhirter was a writer, sports
commentator, athlete and political activist but will best be remembered for
co-founding the "Guinness Book of Records" -- now known as "Guinness World
Records" -- in 1955.

The book of superlatives topped the British bestseller list that year and has
since become a publishing phenomenon with sales of more than 100 million copies
in 100 different countries and 37 languages.

It lists every world record from the breathtaking to the bizarre -- such as the
world's fastest chicken plucker.

McWhirter's family said in a statement:

"Norris cared passionately about Great Britain, democracy and the rule of law
and was always active in politics, but usually behind the scenes...

"The two things he attached most importance to were the freedom of the
individual and the sovereignty of the United Kingdom."

Outside their publishing careers, McWhirter and his brother Ross founded the
Freedom Association, a right-wing group that campaigned against British
involvement in the European Union (news - web sites).

Both brothers held strong political views. Ross was assassinated by the Irish
Republican Army (news - web sites) (IRA) in 1975 for his outspoken opinions on
the turbulent situation in Northern Ireland.

The killing shocked Norris, but he maintained a high public profile with
appearances on the BBC children's show "Record Breakers," and later wrote a book
criticizing the European Union.

He ended his editing career at the Guinness book in 1986 but stayed with it for
another decade in an advisory role.

He leaves a wife and two children.

Monday, 12 April
Pablo Ordaz Crispin, aka Great Goliath, pro wrestler, of a heart attack, 69.

Thursday, 15 April
John D. Hess, TV writer ("Love of Life"), of lung cancer, 85.

Monday, 19 April
Tim Burstall, film director ("Attack Force Z"), after a stroke, 76.
Jim Cantalupo, restaurateur (McDonald's), of a heart attack, 60.
Philip Locke, actor ("Thunderball"), cause not reported, 76.
Frank Morrison, Nebraska governor (D, 1961-67), of cancer, 98.
Norris McWhirter, trivia editor (Guinness Book of World Records), of a heart
attack, 78.

Wednesday, 21 April
Mary McGrory, columnist (Washington Post), after a lengthy illness, 85.

Thursday, 22 April
Art Devlin, sports commentator (ABC), 81.
Pat Tillman, NFL football player (Arizona), shot by enemy fire while serving
in the U.S. Army in Iraq, 27.


Friday, 23 April
Bill Brundige, sportscaster (Los Angeles), of heart failure, 89.
Philip Hamburger, writer (The New Yorker), of cardiac arrest, 89.
Clara Bridges Purnell, sausage producer (Pernell Sausage Co.), 102.

Saturday, 24 April
Estée Lauder, cosmetics producer, of cardiopulmonary arrest, 97.
Frankie Scott, country singer ("The Smokey Mountain Jamboree"), after a
stroke, 84.

Sunday, 25 April
Alphonzo Bell Jr., U.S. Congressman (R-CA, 1961-77),
Albert Paulsen, actor ("One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich), cause not
reported, 78.
Sid Watson, NFL football player (Pittsburgh), cause not reported, 71.

Monday, 26 April
Johnny Mann, actor, of complications from cancer, 73. *** NOTE: The
singer/conductor of the same name is alive, age 75.
John Parsons, pro tennis writer, of kidney failure, 66.
Hubert Selby Jr., author ("Last Exit to Brooklyn"), of lung disease, 75.

Tuesday, 27 April
H. G. Listiak, radio broadcaster (Phoenix), after a brief illness, in his
50's.

Wednesday, 28 April
Mike Wadsworth, college athletic director (Notre Dame), of cancer, 60.

Thursday, 29 April
Sid Smith, NHL hockey player (Toronto), after a lengthy illness, 78.

Friday, 30 April
Joseph F. Cullman, cigarette manufacturer (Philip Morris), 92.














Tuesday, April 6th
Niki Sullivan, Guitarist with Buddy Holly, Dies

KANSAS CITY (Reuters) - Niki Sullivan, who played rhythm guitar and sang backup
for Buddy Holly on his early hits with The Crickets, has died.

Sullivan, 66, died in his sleep at his home near Kansas City on Tuesday,
according to Tricia Earl of The Buddy Holly Center in Lubbock, Texas.

At an appearance two years ago at the museum, Earl said, Sullivan recalled the
uniqueness of Holly's early music when The Crickets' recorded such enduring
rock-and-roll hits as "That'll Be The Day" and "Maybe Baby," on which Sullivan's
voice can be heard in the original version.

Sullivan toured with The Crickets through 1957 but left the band when it became
apparent Holly did not need a second guitarist, Earl said.

Sullivan also had his own musical aspirations but met with little success,
forming The Plainsmen and The Hollyhawks.

A few months after Sullivan left the Crickets, the band broke up and Holly
struck out on his own. On Feb. 3, 1959, the small plane he chartered after an
Iowa concert crashed, killing the 22-year-old Holly and fellow rockers Ritchie
Valens and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson. The event was immortalized as "The
Day the Music Died" in Don McLean's hit, "American Pie."